Student Support

Teaching Continuity Tips and Tools

This brief guide will help you make the transition to teaching remotely. The page will continue to be updated.

Summary
CHANGES TO TRADITIONAL (A-F) GRADING: The A-F system is the default, i.e., unless a student chooses the Pass/Fail system outlined below. If a student’s grade at the end of the term dictates that they would ordinarily receive a grade of F, they will instead receive a “U,” which will not count against GPA but also does not count as satisfactory completion of the course, meaning no course credit will be given.
 
PASS/FAIL OPTION: Students may choose this option for a single course, multiple courses, all courses, or no courses taken during this period. For each course taken during the period in which this policy is in effect, students will receive a letter grade unless they elect to switch to Pass/Fail grading for that course. Students wishing to choose the Pass/Fail option for a course should notify the Registrar (through a system to be announced) prior to May 5, 2020.
For courses where students choose the Pass/Fail option, regardless of the grade that would have been earned during the term, the student will be assigned either a Pass (P) or Fail (U). Pass will be earned when the grade would ordinarily have been between A and D- (undergraduate courses) or A and C- (graduate courses), while Fail will be earned if the student’s grade is below D- (undergraduate) or C- (graduate). A Pass will count as having successfully completed the course for purposes of academic progress, and the student will receive course credit, but no quality points will be earned, meaning it will not affect the student’s GPA either positively or negatively. A Fail (U) will not count as having successfully completed the course,  meaning no course credit will be received, but likewise will not affect the student’s GPA.
Please note that while a Pass/Fail grade is what will be recorded on the transcript, the traditional letter grade will also be retained for course prerequisite purposes. If you are in a program that requires licensure or certification this may be relevant, and students should consult with their advisors, and, if applicable, with Athletics, Financial Aid, and/or International Student Office before selecting to go to Pass/Fail for courses. All students should check with their advisors about the advisability of the Pass/Fail option.
ACADEMIC STANDING: Students currently on academic probation of any kind will not be penalized based on their grades during this period.
MID-TERM GRADING:  Midterm grades for Spring 2020 are due by April 15, 2020 and faculty are asked to submit grades by this date so that students will be aware of their current standing. However the system will allow faculty to submit midterm grades as late as necessary.
REPEAT POLICY:  All limits contained in the policy regarding repeating courses are suspended for courses taken during this period.
WITHDRAWAL (W) POLICY:  Students may elect to withdraw from a course until May 5, 2020.
INCOMPLETE (INC and INC+) POLICY:  Incomplete grades (INC or INC+) earned during this period will not be converted into failing grades under any circumstances. If the remaining work toward an INC is completed within one academic year, it will be converted to either a letter grade (A-D-) or a Pass grade, but if the work is not completed, it will remain an Incomplete. Policies regarding requesting extensions to make up the INC+ grade remain in place.
COMPLETION OF EXISTING INCOMPLETE (INC and INC+) COURSES:  Students who already have an Incomplete grade (INC or INC+) with work pending will not have such courses converted to failing grades, and will have such reasonable amount of additional time as necessary to complete the work still outstanding.
THIS POLICY IS SUBJECT TO UPDATES AND TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS

FAQ Page for Students

  • Revisit your Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and think flexibly about how to achieve the outcomes. If you’re feeling anxious about the quick transition to online delivery, start your planning by looking back at your SLOs. In most cases, you will be able to guide students to achieving these outcomes—even if you may not be using the exact assignments or teaching strategies you originally planned to use. Keeping the outcomes at the core of your transition planning will help you consider the kinds of changes you might need to make.
  • Review your syllabus, course materials, and policies to determine what needs to change. As much as possible, set reasonable, flexible expectations. Lay everything out clearly in your syllabus and assignment sheets, and use Blackboard Announcements, email, or other digital means to communicate your updated plans.
    • Consider hosting your syllabus/daily schedule on Google Drive so students can see changes as you make them. (Here’s an example.) (Be sure to include a link to these kinds of items on Blackboard for accessibility.)
    • Consider using this form to guide your thinking and planning for the course.
    • You may need to consider Open Educational Resources for students who left their textbooks in their dorms. Redshelf and VitalSource are offering free ebooks, and OER Commons is a great site for open educational resources.
  • Communicate with students as soon as possible. Once you have a plan in place for any immediate changes—such as an extended deadline or announcement about how a class will be made up—clearly announce your expectations to students.
    • Highlight important changes to the syllabus, including deadline changes—and be sure your syllabus is posted on Blackboard. Using Blackboard as a central meeting point is key. Make sure all information is available there, including your Zoom Meeting ID.
    • The Blackboard Announcements function is particularly helpful for updating students. See the support page for details on how to post announcements, collect assignments, and more.
    • Let students know how soon they should expect a reply from you.
  • Keep it Simple. This is a quick transition, and it is more important to establish community and communicate with students than it is to try and learn 5 new technologies right now.
*Many of the above tips were drawn generously from resources listed on Daniel Stanford’s “Remote Teaching Resources for Business Continuity” Google Doc.
  • Communicating with Students
    • Manage your time by collecting frequently asked questions and posting them to the Blackboard Announcements page so all students can see your response.
    • Consider holding Zoom open office hours, especially at the beginning of the transition, to make sure students feel supported.
    • Keep communications mobile-friendly. Many students may only have their phones to work from, so try to use mobile-friendly file formats. PDFs are typically the most mobile-friendly for email attachments. You can easily turn a Powerpoint into a PDF, for example, and shrink the size of PDFs.
  • Engaging Students
    • To really engage students in conversations, create video breakout rooms in Zoom! These instructions show how to pre-assign Zoom Breakout Rooms.
    • If you’re tech savvy, try some survey or polling tools. Or try a tool like Flipgrid for boosting social learning through video discussions.
    • Break your planned lectures into shorter, 5-6 minute videos that students can view asynchronously.
    • Did you recently cancel a guest speaker? Consider sending them a Zoom link to participate in class instead.
  • Establishing (or Re-Establishing) Community
    • It is important for students to interact with one another and to also regularly feel your presence in your online course. There are a variety of approaches to try out:
  • Assessing Student Work
    • You will first want to consider if you need to change any scheduled assessments to make them more online-friendly. You can turn a paper test into an online test. You can use blogs, journals, and wikis to assess students’ learning and progress. See these videos for help.
    • Try your best to offer frequent and timely feedback, keeping in mind that feedback is a tool to help students learn.
  • (Virtually) Visiting the Library
    • The library has a variety of resources for faculty and students, including their “Chat with a Librarian” service; “Library Help” email service; “Zoom Reference” service; and remote “Research Consultation” service. They also have a 24/7 “Ask a Librarian” service in place. Visit their MyCharger page for more information.
  • Addressing Diversity and Inclusion Issues
    • See these best practices for maintaining equity and inclusion in remote learning from the Myatt Center for Diversity & Inclusion
While transitioning your course online quickly is a challenge, we encourage you to also review these best practices for online teaching and learning.
While you are transitioning to online instruction in the midst of an emergency, you may not wish to implement a lot of new technologies; however, you may find some of the tools below helpful for your courses.
    1. WeVideo – Video editor with free 30-day trial for teachers.
    2. Zeeting – Presentation tool that includes interactive surveys and polls for audience members.
    3. Poll Everywhere – Remote audience engagement tool.
    4. Peergrade – Facilitates online feedback sessions with students.
    5. Perusall – Allows social annotation of texts.
    6. Flipgrid – For video-based discussion forums.
    7. Thinglink – The free version allows you to create interactive images.
    8. Genially – Presentation tool that also allows you to create games and infographics.
    9. Kahoot – An app for creating learning games.
    10. Anchor – Free podcast creation tool.

Going Online in a Hurry: What to do and Where to Start,” Chronicle of Higher Education – A great resource for critical questions you’ll want to ask yourself as you start planning your transition to remote teaching.

Keep Teaching: Resources for Higher Ed – An online community for faculty across the country to share resources and ideas, and ask questions about teaching remotely.

Education Companies offering Free Subscriptions due to School Closings – An extensive list of educational companies that are currently offering their services for free.

Building a Community of Learning – Provides a variety of links to resources on topics such as feedback, accommodating for diversity and inclusion, building a teaching persona—all in the context of online teaching.

Blackboard Webinars – Blackboard Is offering free training webinars for instructors from March 17 through April 2.

Quality Matters Checklist – A remote instruction checklist with actionable strategies, tips, and considerations.

Google for Education – Google has lessons your students can take, such as how to prepare a resume, how to evaluate the credibility of online sources, and more.

Course Progress Checklist – This checklist created by Claire Glynn can be distributed to your students to help them track their progress in each course and stay organized.

Open Educational Resources curated for University of New Haven faculty 

Sharing a resource re: supporting faculty learning about teaching with tech, we offered a free public webinar series on the basics of online student engagement, trauma-informed teaching & learning online, inclusive online teaching, and a panel of instructors who have experience teaching in both physical and online classrooms, and the recordings & materials are freely available here: https://bit.ly/CSSW_WebinarSeries_TransitioningOnline

  • Responding to Novel Coronavirus: A Faculty Triage Guide for Decision Making

  • Teaching Continuity & Creating Community

  • Coffee and Course Continuity Discussion: Fast Feedback (will take a moment to load)

  • Topic: Coffee and Course Continuity Conversations (3) – Coping with the stress of this remote teaching environment (will take a moment to load)

  • Beyond Powerpoint (will take a moment to load)

  • Coffee and Course Continuity Conversations: Exams and Presentations  (will take a moment to load)


Please reach out. We’re Here to Help.

Below, we share some open office hours so you can pop in and ask questions. However, also please feel to reach out to any of us, any time via email. We are all happy to help.

Alan MacDougall –
Director of Educational Technology
  • Can provide support for the following:
    • Login into and using Zoom (primary contact)
    • Blackboard Technical Support and merging and copying courses
    • Kaltura, including uploading existing media
    • Linked In Learning and Third Party Publisher Tools
    • Linking your third-party tools to Blackboard
    • Password rests
    • Student Blackboard support
Zoom meeting link: https://unewhaven.zoom.us/j/6806294802 Hours (East Coast GMT -4)

Monday

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Tuesday

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Wednesday

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Thursday

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Friday

3:00pm – 4:00pm

Crystal Cohen – 

Manager of Online Instructional Technology & Support

Office of eLearning

  • Can provide eLearning Blackboard support, including:
    • Organizing course content
    • Blackboard navigation and tools
    • Setting up assignments and tests
    • Discussion Board

Please email ccohen@newhaven.edu to set up individual Zoom sessions on any of the topics above. 

Kevin Gardner – 

Senior Learning/Instructional Designer 

  • Can provide support for the following:
    • Constructing and organizing learning environments
    • guidance on which tools work best for certain situations
    • technical support with Blackboard tools
    • selecting appropriate instructional strategies
    • developing materials for online content (course calendars and alignment maps, adding images, videos, and other multimedia content)

Zoom meeting link: https://unewhaven.zoom.us/j/4775474439

Kevin is always available for a call on his cell at 203-947-5934 and can set up a Zoom meeting anytime.

Monday

3:00 PM- 4:00 PM
Update on Learning & Course Development
Overview of the Online Course Template
Tips & Tricks for Teaching Online
Q&A

Lisa Scranton –

Director of Technical Training

  • Can provide support for the following:
    • Blackboard: Content, Assignments, Tests, Discussion Boards, etc.
    • Zoom: meetings or recording lectures.
    • Kaltura: recording lectures, uploading video

Zoom meeting link: https://unewhaven.zoom.us/j/4775474439

Feel free to email Lisa anytime at lscranton@newhaven.edu

Monday

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Tuesday

6:00pm – 8:00pm

Wednesday

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Thursday

6:00pm – 8:00pm

Friday

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Jenna Shefield –

Assistant Provost for Curriculum Innovation

Can help with any of the following:

  • Blackboard course design and gradebook
  • Using Kaltura for screencasting class or assignment feedback
  • Using TurnItin for peer review or giving feedback on assignments
  • How to create short videos of course content
  • Creating effective discussion forums

 

Contact Jenna any time at jsheffield@newhaven.edu. Zoom meeting ID: 745-423-7889